Voice of America 1959 — VOA/USIA Booklet

Cold War Radio Museum February 8, 2018 In 1959, the Voice of America (VOA) had a clear and convincing public relations message to describe its mission and to justify its $20 million budget (approx. $168 million in today’s dollars) within the United States Information Agency (USIA). By comparison, VOA’s budget

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Brief History of VOA’s Domestic Propaganda

OPINION Cold War Radio Museum How Voice of America Censored Solzhenitsyn   Brief History of VOA’s Domestic Propaganda   By Ted Lipien The Voice of America (VOA) was an easier target than Radio Free Europe (RFE) or Radio Liberty (RL) for U.S. government bureaucrats wanting to restrict human rights broadcasting

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SOLZHENITSYN Target of KGB Propaganda and Censorship by Voice of America

OPINION Cold War Radio Museum How Voice of America Censored Solzhenitsyn       SOLZHENITSYN Target of KGB Propaganda and Censorship by Voice of America   By Ted Lipien     This research article written for Cold War Radio Museum website to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the 1917

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China, Iran, Cuba, North Korea

OPINION Cold War Radio Museum How Voice of America Censored Solzhenitsyn     China, Iran, Cuba, North Korea   By Ted Lipien When in 1974 the Voice of America (VOA) banned Alexandr Solzhenitsyn from its programs, the push for the ban may have originated with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

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The Obama ‘Reset’ with Russia

OPINION Cold War Radio Museum How Voice of America Censored Solzhenitsyn       The Obama “Reset” with Russia   By Ted Lipien Hillary Clinton seemed to have had some understanding of how Russian propaganda works when she made her critical comments about the Broadcasting Board of Governors in 2013

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O.W.I. 1942 Photos of Polish Students Exhibit

Cold War Radio Museum’s first online exhibition of photographs shows Polish students recording broadcasts in Washington in Sept. 1942 for the WWII U.S. propaganda agency, the Office of War Information (O.W.I.) which included what became known later as the Voice of America (VOA). See Exhibit: Office of War Information Photos

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