Radio Free Europe’s 10th anniversary—a success story

For Cold War Radio Museum By TED LIPIEN As described by Sig Mickelson in his 1983 book America’s Other Voice: The Story of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, Radio Free Europe began broadcasting behind the Iron Curtain on July 4, 1950. On July 4, 1950, only 13 months after

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Paul Harvey, David Brinkley, Howard K. Smith, and John Chancellor signed 1967 VOA first day cover

This First Day of Issue Cover for the Voice of America 1967 stamp has autographs from several famous American radio and television broadcasters including Paul Harvey, David Brinkley, and Howard K. Smith. John Chancellor of NBC News who was the Voice of America director from 1965 to 1967, also signed the First Day of

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Hollywood’s Polish Latin lover who terrorized Voice of America broadcasters

For Cold War Radio Museum By TED LIPIEN The name of the handsome man with a tanned Latin complexion in the 1942 publicity photo was Edward Raquello. He was a Hollywood actor, but he soon became known as a “very talented terror” at the Voice of America (VOA), the U.S.

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George Soros’ building in NYC saw Voice of America’s early love affair with Stalin

By Ted Lipien for Cold War Radio Museum The Argonaut Building in New York City at 224 West 57 and Broadway, where first Voice of America (VOA) radio programs were produced in 1942, is now the headquarters of Open Society Foundations (OSF), formerly the Open Society Institute, originally created and funded by

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VOICE OF AMERICA – EAGLE ON THE MOON – 1969

2019 MP3 Recording of Original VOA Audio, Video with NASA Photographs, Transcript and Images of VOA’s 1969 LP Record by Cold War Radio Museum MP3 Audio of 1969 VOA Radio Broadcast on LP Record 2019 Cold War Radio Museum Video with NASA Images and MP3 Audio of 1969 VOA Broadcast

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Voice of America? – Why The Question Mark?

In 1948, U.S. senators called VOA programs “ridiculous,” “unjustified” and “deplorable.” Liberal, moderate, and conservative lawmakers, some of whom even accused the Voice of America of “slander” and “libel” in how several U.S. states were described in radio programs acquired from NBC under a government contract, did not seek to

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VOA 1978 Verification Card

During the Cold War, Voice of America (VOA) broadcast mostly radio programs. Most of the radio transmissions were delivered through shortwave. VOA would send out QSL cards as a written confirmation of reception to those listeners who requested them by letter. The 1978 QSL card from VOA was a post card with pictures

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Rep. Howard H. Buffett, Warren Buffett’s father, feared domestic VOA propaganda

Cold War Radio Museum As the U.S. Congress was debating in June 1947 the eventual passage of the Smith-Mundt Act, which implicitly placed restrictions on domestic dissemination of government news through the Voice of America (VOA) while funding expansion of State Department’s cultural and academic exchange programs, Congressman Howard Buffett

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Refugees from Poland exposed Soviet propaganda of a Voice of America Communist

By Ted Lipien for Cold War Radio Museum Two extraordinary refugees from Poland helped to expose in 1956 to the U.S. Congress anti-U.S. propaganda activities of a communist journalist Stefan Arski, also known as Artur Salman, who had worked on World War II radio broadcasts which later became known as

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Stalin Prize-Winning Chief Writer of Voice of America News

Cold War Radio Museum  “I established contact at the Soviet embassy with people who spoke English and were willing to feed me important bits and pieces from their side of the wire. I had long ago, somewhat facetiously, suggested ‘Yankee Doodle’ as our musical signal, and now that silly little

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